Film festivals – M8D http://m8d.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:00:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://m8d.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-120x120.png Film festivals – M8D http://m8d.org/ 32 32 Why Oldenburg is the most independent of all independent film festivals – The Hollywood Reporter https://m8d.org/why-oldenburg-is-the-most-independent-of-all-independent-film-festivals-the-hollywood-reporter/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:00:46 +0000 https://m8d.org/why-oldenburg-is-the-most-independent-of-all-independent-film-festivals-the-hollywood-reporter/ Many film festivals celebrate independent films, but few live the independent spirit quite like the Oldenburg Festival. Each year, the northern German event faces the same challenges – attracting stars, finding venues, attracting media attention – as most independent productions. And like independent films, Oldenburg is always chronically short of funds. But every year, in […]]]>

Many film festivals celebrate independent films, but few live the independent spirit quite like the Oldenburg Festival. Each year, the northern German event faces the same challenges – attracting stars, finding venues, attracting media attention – as most independent productions. And like independent films, Oldenburg is always chronically short of funds.

But every year, in the best indie tradition, Oldenburg manages to find a way.

In 2001, blocked by the lack of German independent films, or even of a true tradition of German independent film, Oldenburg decided to create his own. The supported festival Movies at 99 eurosan omnibus short film project of 12 five-minute films – each shot on a mini-DV camera with a budget of €99 ($105) – to prove, as the promotional text puts it, “that German films can also to be wild, new, modern, funny, political and entertaining… and that young German filmmakers come together, inspire exciting young actors to come up with an idea and simply film it.Oldenburg repeated the experience in 2003 with 99euro Movies 2.

The first group of German independent directors included Nicolette Krebitz, whose 2016 films Wild which premiered at Sundance and was in competition at the Berlin Film Festival this year with AEIOU: a quick alphabet of love; Matthias Glasner, who followed with the 2006 Tribeca Film Festival Jury Prize winner Free will; and Rolf Peter Kahl, the latter of whom, When Susan Sontag sat in the audiencea dramatic recreation of the 1966 ‘Dialogue on Women’s Liberation’ debate held in New York City Hall between Norman Mailer, Germaine Greer, Jill Johnston, Jacqueline Ceballos and Diana Trilling, has just arrived in German cinemas.

In 2005, when Oldenburg needed a venue for premieres, festival director Torsten Neumann approached the director of the city’s high-security prison, the JVA. The result was “Knastkino” (Prison Cinema), now an Oldenburg tradition, where the festival holds annual galas for guests and inmates who sit side by side. Guests pass the full prison security check to be allowed entry. And the prisoners adopt their best behavior. The event went off without a single incident in more than 15 years.

Even in 2020, when the COVID pandemic interrupted public events around the world and the festival was forced to take place only online, Oldenburg found a way. German regulations allowed small groups to gather in private homes, so Neumann turned to festival fans to open their homes, and the Living Room Galas were born. Directors and guest film stars walked the red carpet to private homes – Oldenburg pimped the aisles with klieg lights and local paparazzi to give it a proper gala atmosphere – where they watched their premiere together on the couch and answered questions in an intimate Q&A afterwards. Oldenburg broadcast the whole thing live.

As far as stars go, Oldenburg has had its share, though it still leans to the indie side of the spectrum: Nicolas Cage, Amanda Plummer, Keith Carradine, Matthew Modine, Peter Dinklage, Mira Sorvino. And like local audiences, Oldenburg is fiercely loyal. Actor Seymour Cassel, the John Cassavetes regular who received a retrospective at the Oldenburg Festival in 2008, was so impressed he kept coming back, with Little New York (2009), Pete Smalls is dead (2010), Fort McCoy (2011) and lost angels (2012). Eventually, Oldenburg renamed his acting honor the Seymour Cassel Prize, and after Cassel’s death in 2019, the festival held a retrospective honoring the beloved indie icon.

When it comes to media promotion, Oldenburg knows how to attract crowds. For Michael Maxxis’ opening film in 2020 puppy love, Neumann received permission from a newly constructed building in the city center to let Spanish street artist Okuda San Miguel, who had designed the film’s poster, create a spray mural inspired by one of the scenes from the film featuring stars Paz de la Huerta and Hopper. Penn. The technicolor result, featuring Okuda’s signature combination of organic and geometric shapes, became an Oldenburg tourist attraction.

Last year, Oldenburg even managed to put a new spin on the masterclass, that old film festival tradition of hosting interviews with directors and guest stars, putting it all on the road. The Find Your Wild program has seen the likes of Laotian director Mattie Do (The long walk), Dakota Loesch and Scott Monahan (the writer and director-plus-star of Oldenburg’s 2021 Best Picture winner Anchoringrespectively), as well as veteran Italian director-producer Ovidio G. Assonitis (Tentacles, The visitor) get into a Jeep Wrangler to cruise the streets of downtown Oldenburg while talking about their life and work. Think carpool karaoke without singing.

Oldenburg has yet to reveal the lineup for its 29th edition, scheduled for September 14-18, let alone the unique events, parties and experiences that will make this year’s festival unforgettable. But after three decades of staying real and finding a way, one thing is certain: Oldenburg Festival 2022 won’t just be a celebration of independent cinema, it will be an independent experience.

A film maestro pays tribute to a master

Thai composer and filmmaker Somtow Sucharitkul had so much fun when he brought his youth orchestra Siam Sinfonietta to Oldenburg last year that he is returning for the 2022 edition, this time to honor the legacy of one of his musical heroes, Bernard Hermann.

Somtow Sucharitkul performs with his youth orchestra Siam Sinfonietta at the Oldenburg Festival 2021.
Courtesy of Oldenburg Film Festival

Few musicians would fly 8,000 miles for an encore. But Sucharitkul and his orchestra are ready to make the trip from Bangkok to Oldenburg again.

Somtow says he fell in love with the festival after being invited to the 2021 event. Initially, it was just to attend the world premiere of The conductor, a Thai horror film that Somtow wrote and starred in (he plays a murderous, power-crazed composer). But after talking to Oldenburg festival director Torsten Neumann, Somtow became more ambitious. He invited his youth orchestra, the Siam Sinfonietta — which performs in The conductor — to join him in northern Germany. Together they opened and closed the 2021 festival, performing music from the film, as well as original renditions of other scores, including those by Oldenburg’s guest of honor in 2021, Italian genre master Ovidio Assonitis (Tentacles, beyond the door).

“Torsten’s bold idea of ​​’just going ahead and doing it, screwing up the consequences’ was something I immediately admired. [He’s] a soul sister. His idea allowed me to contribute something really different,” says Somtow. “It also broadened our children’s repertoire. They’re very good at Mahler and Tchaikovsky and all that – but there’s no occasion to do, say, Morricone in a classical concert that often.

For this year’s return, Somtow is planning a tribute to Bernard Herrmann, the legendary composer whose work spans scores of Citizen Kane and psychology for Taxi driver.

“If there had been no film industry, Herrmann would have become one of the great opera composers of the 20th century. He wrote an opera, The Wuthering Heights — it’s film music on steroids,” says Somtow, who adds that he has composed nearly 20 operas for the stage.

“But when I think, ‘Which composer influenced me in my composition for this form of dramatic art more than anyone else?’, I feel like saying Mozart or Wagner or Strauss, and I end up often by looking Bernard Herrmann in the eye. My love of horror comes from my mother who takes me to see psychology several times when I was about 8 or 9 years old. She kept her eyes covered. … I did not do it. The score left an indelible impression.

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‘Yamberzal’ short film set to hit global film festivals https://m8d.org/yamberzal-short-film-set-to-hit-global-film-festivals/ Sun, 15 May 2022 08:39:38 +0000 https://m8d.org/yamberzal-short-film-set-to-hit-global-film-festivals/ There’s been so much going on around us over the years regarding various things in the world, across communities, cultures and societies, especially in India, and specifically in Jammu and Kashmir, about the atrocities that people have faced. It is the most breathtakingly beautiful place in India and maybe in the whole world which has […]]]>

There’s been so much going on around us over the years regarding various things in the world, across communities, cultures and societies, especially in India, and specifically in Jammu and Kashmir, about the atrocities that people have faced. It is the most breathtakingly beautiful place in India and maybe in the whole world which has always grabbed the headlines for several reasons. Therefore, it also becomes imperative to let the world know about the many pains hidden behind the beauty of the place. To fulfill this responsibility, a promising new short film has been made with Kashmir as the backdrop, featuring raw and real stories.

The entertainment world has always come up with projects that have the power to draw people’s maximum attention to things that really need their attention. J&K producer and entrepreneur Syed Ali Asgar Razvi tried to do the same with this short film titled “Yamberzal” which is set to hit global film festivals. The film is written and directed by Raja Sarfaraz and made under Farah Film Production. Producer Syed Ali Asgar Razvi says the short film is based on the struggles a poor orphan boy faces in education in the Union Territory. It also presents the challenges of the global health pandemic, the problems of less infrastructure, terrorism and lost social trust.

Furthermore, he mentions that the movie features a love story of a Kashmiri Hindu Pandit school teacher with a student and also talks about a policeman and how the story takes a twist from there. This is a 30 minute short film, and part 2 will also be shot in Kashmir. It stars Ali Razvi, Ahmad bin Umar in the lead, Jameela Akhtar and Shadab Khan. Yamberzal is beautifully photographed by DOP Vikram Mehta. The actors look mesmerizing in Nargis Avan’s costumes, and Ash K’s music adds more impact to the film’s storyline.

Yamberzal will first be screened at international and domestic film festivals, which will take Jammu and Kashmir’s cinema to new heights, and then streamed on OTT.

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2 sci-fi film festivals are back with cool and eclectic films https://m8d.org/2-sci-fi-film-festivals-are-back-with-cool-and-eclectic-films/ Thu, 05 May 2022 16:00:44 +0000 https://m8d.org/2-sci-fi-film-festivals-are-back-with-cool-and-eclectic-films/ Two diamonds from the Bay Area movie scene get their chance to shine starting this week. After a two-year absence, the San Francisco Silent Film Festival returns May 5-11 with its packed 25th schedule at the Castro Theater. In San Rafael, the sixth DocLands Documentary Film Festival is taking place at the Smith Rafael Film […]]]>

Two diamonds from the Bay Area movie scene get their chance to shine starting this week.

After a two-year absence, the San Francisco Silent Film Festival returns May 5-11 with its packed 25th schedule at the Castro Theater.

In San Rafael, the sixth DocLands Documentary Film Festival is taking place at the Smith Rafael Film Center with in-person screenings May 5-12 and online viewing options May 5-11.

Let’s first dive into the rich program of DocLands.

Avid surfers and fans of adventure documentaries should grab the festival‘s opening night pick, the inspirational nail-biter “Wild Waters”. It receives a world premiere. Directed with verve and style by Mikey Corker, “Waters” defies categorization as it traces Matt Knight’s Hecate catamaran expedition to the Savage Isles, which took place after Knight read a treasure hunter’s poetic diary. . Big wave surfer extraordinaire Andrew Cotton joins the crew in an attempt to ride iconic waves in wild and unpredictable waters. As is the case with many sporting or artistic endeavors, plans change, leading the crew in surprising, sometimes devastating directions. “Savage Waters” is a deeply moving experience, a story of triumph and resilience in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. Screening: 7 p.m. May 5; Smith Rafael Cinematographic Center.

If you want to get a thumbs up on future award contenders, make sure you don’t miss director Alex Pritz’s eye-opener. “The territory.” The conversation with the talented filmmaker should then be enlightening.

The two-time winner of this year’s Sundance Film Festival finds Pritz throwing us into the heart of a tumultuous battle in the Brazilian rainforest, where members of the Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau indigenous community struggle to protect their land from the illegal settlers who settle by burning precious forests. Told from different angles – activists, Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau people, settlers, etc. – this immersive experience also involves the conservative agenda of President Jair Bolsonaro. It is an exceptional documentary that finds hope in the midst of despair. It is also produced by renowned filmmaker Darren Aronofsky. Screening: 1 p.m. on May 6.

The May 7 line-up includes a screening of “Exposing Muybridge” by Oakland director Marc Shaffer, a fascinating insight into the life and work of 19th-century San Francisco photographer Eadweard Muybridge – a pioneer whose photographs of horses at a gallop paved the way for cinematographic passions. Screening: 8 p.m. on May 7.

California wine connoisseurs will find plenty to enjoy at Lori Miller’s “Living Wine” receive a world premiere. Miller speaks at length with natural winemakers and regional experts about their vow to never use chemical additives and move away from a corporate winemaking structure. This will certainly encourage you to check labels and also look for wineries that adhere to the same protocols and high standards. Screening: 3 p.m. on May 8.

Lisa Riordan, originally from San Francisco, and Zara Katz, originally from Sevastopol, “A Woman Outside” tells the poignant and inspiring story of Kristal Bush, who created Bridging the Gap Transportation, an innovative van program that helps reunite families with incarcerated relatives. Their film, which is getting a California premiere, follows Bush at a pivotal time in his life, when his father and brother return home after spending years in prison. Screening: 5:00 p.m. on May 8.

For something entirely different, there is “Crows Are White” a personal documentary that follows filmmaker Ahsen Nadeem’s quest to find more meaning and clarity in his life. The Los Angeles filmmaker travels to a remote monastery in Japan where monks test the limits of their physical abilities. He receives the cold shoulder instantly upon arrival, but befriends the unconventional monk Ryushin. Their friendship and their personal journey as well as the humor of the films have earned “Crows Are White” its wings. Screening: 7 p.m. on May 8.

“La Guerra Civil” is an eye-opening documentary about a legendary boxing match between Oscar De La Hoya and Julio César Chávez. (DocLands)

A few other recommendations: that of Berkeley filmmaker Sara Dosa “Fire of Love” is a sensory experience that highlights the love and work of two French volcanologists (11:30 am May 11); the intense and topical “Navalny” (7:00 p.m., May 6) focuses on Russian President Vladimir Putin’s political opponent, Alexei Navalny, and his suspicious and near-fatal poisoning; and the drive “Civil war” (7:30 p.m., May 6), which examines the boxing fight that divides Oscar De La Hoya and Julio Cesar Chavez.

You might also want to catch the 7 p.m. screening on May 7 of “Exposure,” which details a daring attempt – made all the more precarious by climate change – to ski across the Arctic to the North Pole. Before that, “Sarah Squared,” a 3-minute short film by Greenbrae residents Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto about the research work of two marine ecologists at the Point Reyes National Seashore, will screen.

Details: Most screenings $16.50; the full program, tickets and more information are available at www.doclands.com.

Meanwhile, the San Francisco Silent Film Festival kicks off in a special way with the world premiere restoration of Erich von Stroheim’s deliciously delicious 1922 epic (it runs 146 minutes). “Crazy women”. It’s a drunken tale that tells the story of a bunch of rotten amoral scumbags who insinuate themselves into the lives of well-to-do women in order to drain them of their wealth. The striking central coast makes a quaint and fitting substitute for Monaco in a funny comedy that ridicules the rich and notorious. To fully complement the shenanigans unfolding onscreen, Timothy Brock takes on the leadership of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music Orchestra.

The stunning restoration is a joint project of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the San Francisco Silent Film Festival. It will be screened with the four-minute short film “San Francisco: The Golden Gate City”. Screening: 7 p.m. May 5; the Castro.

There’s so much more to see in the 29 programs offered, so here are some other recommendations, including the ever-prolific Clara Bow in “The Primrose Path” (4:45 p.m. May 6), brilliant comedian Buster Keaton’s last performance in the 1928s “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” (3:00 p.m. May 7) and closing night feature, a restored version of Oscar Wilde’s witty comedy “Lady Windermere’s Fan” (7 p.m. May 11) with Ronald Colman, May McAvoy, Bert Lytell and Irene Rich. It is directed by Ernst Lubitsch, who also had an influential career in talkies.

One of the lineup’s standout standouts arrives in the form of DJ Spooky’s (Paul D. Miller) live remix and reinterpretation of DW Griffith’s classic, classically racist 1915 epic. “The Birth of a Nation.” In his innovative revamp, DJ Spooky strips the original of its glorification of the Ku Klux Klan and creates a more truthful account of slavery. The 70-minute “Rebirth of a Nation” includes an onstage conversation with the artist and Wesley Morris of The New York Times (7 p.m. May 7).

Details: Screenings $16-$25; schedule, tickets and more information at silentfilm.org.

Contact Randy Myers at soisrandy@gmail.com.

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Latest ‘We Drank Our Tears’ Films Accepted at 2 More Film Festivals | Way of life https://m8d.org/latest-we-drank-our-tears-films-accepted-at-2-more-film-festivals-way-of-life/ Wed, 04 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/latest-we-drank-our-tears-films-accepted-at-2-more-film-festivals-way-of-life/ (MCS) – Mount Carmel School has learned that its latest entry in the ‘We Drank Our Tears’ series, the stories of Visitacion Camacho, Henry Indalecio and David ‘Uncle Dave’ Sablan, have been accepted into two other film festivals. The films will be screened at the Tokyo Lift-Off Film Festival 2022 and as part of the […]]]>

(MCS) – Mount Carmel School has learned that its latest entry in the ‘We Drank Our Tears’ series, the stories of Visitacion Camacho, Henry Indalecio and David ‘Uncle Dave’ Sablan, have been accepted into two other film festivals. The films will be screened at the Tokyo Lift-Off Film Festival 2022 and as part of the 2nd Masima Pacific Islands Film Tour.

The Lift-Off Global Network is an organization encompassing worldwide live screening events, distribution initiatives, a seasonal awards show and an ever-growing and active network of independent film creators. The Tokyo Lift-Off Film Festival is one of the most successful of the season, with back-to-back sales and huge interest from the general public and local press based in Japan. The Annual Masima Film Tour is the premier film festival created by Pacific Islanders for Pacific Islanders in the United States. The tour is a collaboration between the Utah Pacific Island Film Series and the Salt Lake Film Society to bring Pacific stories to a wider audience.

The writer and producer of the film series and president of Northern Marianas College, Galvin Deleon Guerrero, EdD, was very happy to learn about the screenings. He said: “These films have empowered a whole new generation of storytellers to learn more about their history and to tell these important stories of resilience and hope.” All of the films in the series were made primarily with students from the school as cast and crew members. As Deleon Guerrero noted, “Just as the original book was the work of young students telling the stories of their elders in print form, these films are the work of young students telling the stories of our islands in film form. .”

All films in the series are adapted from “We Drank Our Tears”, a 2004 oral history of the civilian experience of World War II battles in Saipan and Tinian, published by the Pacific STAR Young Writers Foundation. In 1944, some of the last battles of World War II took place on the Pacific islands of Saipan and Tinian. 933 indigenous Chamorro and Refaluwasch civilians did not survive the battles. The book and film series tell some of these stories.

The film stars Jessiana Tenorio as Visitacion Camacho, Jayson Tagaubel as Henry Indalecio and Kainoa Tenorio as Dave Sablan. Their stories were led by AlumKnight Mikee Mendoza, current senior Larry Cruz, and the school’s Director of Institutional Development and AlumKnight, Victoria Deleon Guerrero.

The production was made possible by the CNMI CARES Relief Fund for Organizations and supported by the National Endowment for the Arts through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act of 2020.

For more information on the movies or Mount Carmel School, visit www.mountcarmelsaipan.com

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The Office of Arts, Culture and Entrepreneurship partners with local film festivals for a captivating look at history https://m8d.org/the-office-of-arts-culture-and-entrepreneurship-partners-with-local-film-festivals-for-a-captivating-look-at-history/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/the-office-of-arts-culture-and-entrepreneurship-partners-with-local-film-festivals-for-a-captivating-look-at-history/ City’s Office of Arts, Culture and Entrepreneurship partners with local film festivals for a captivating look at history The Freep Film Festival and the Detroit Black Film Festival offer more than 100 films and special events during their April and September runs The Office of Arts, Culture and Entrepreneurship (Detroit ACE) is proud to join […]]]>

City’s Office of Arts, Culture and Entrepreneurship partners with local film festivals for a captivating look at history

  • The Freep Film Festival and the Detroit Black Film Festival offer more than 100 films and special events during their April and September runs
  • The Office of Arts, Culture and Entrepreneurship (Detroit ACE) is proud to join the Detroit Black Film Festival (DetBff) and the Freep Film Festival in celebrating great documentary and narrative cinema this year.

DETROIT – Media are invited to a press event 4 p.m. Tuesday April 26, at Cinema Detroit, 4126 3rd Ave, Detroit, MI 48201, to hear details about the Freep Film Festival, now in its ninth year, and DetBFF, now in its third year. The event will be streamed live on YouTube and the City of Detroit’s Facebook page.

“Detroit has so much to be proud of in our growing film industry, and these two festivals reflect that,” said Rochelle Riley, the city’s director of arts and culture. FreepFilmFest will open April 27 with the first public screening of “Gradually, Then Suddenly: The Bankruptcy of Detroit,” a documentary that explores the city’s historic bankruptcy and its path forward. The film, which will premiere at the Detroit Film Theater at the Detroit Institute of Arts, tells the dramatic story of Detroit’s 2013 bankruptcy. It portrays the city’s dire financial situation like a canary in the coal mine for municipalities in the country. From the controversial appointment of an emergency manager to the enactment of the so-called Grand Bargain – which helped protect the Detroit Institute of Arts’ endangered collection and preserve the city’s pensions – the film offers new perspectives and behind-the-scenes details of the critical moment in the city’s history.

The festival will also host the world premiere of Daniel Land’s “America, You Kill Me” about Detroit gay rights pioneer Jeffrey Montgomery, who will attend the press conference. The film will be screened on Thursday April 28 at the Redford Theatre.

the Detroit Black Film Festival (DetBFF) will host its opening night on September 21, 2022, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the movie, “Lady Sings the Blues.” The collaboration with the Motown Museum includes an opening gala at the Garden Theater.

“Lady Sings the Blues” is a 1972 American biographical drama film directed by Sidney J. Furie about jazz singer Billie Holiday. The film stars Detroit’s Diana Ross, as well as Billy Dee Williams, Richard Pryor, James T. Callahan and Scatman Crothers. Ross debuted as Billie Holiday in the film while under contract to Motown founder Berry Gordy. At the time, she was emerging as a solo artist after years with The Supremes. The film was produced by Motown Productions for Paramount Pictures. Ross was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress. And the soundtrack, which featured Ross singing Holiday songs, was a hit. Both Ross and Williams won the NAACP Image Awards for Outstanding Actor and Actress in a Motion Picture for their performances.

Co-founder Marshalle Favors said she and her husband, Lazar, chose the iconic film because “it’s a renowned classic, and the stellar performance of it brought it to the big screen thanks to Motown.” The duo plans to announce special guests in September.

Motown Museum CEO Robin Terry said, “The Motown Museum is thrilled to partner with the Detroit Black Film Festival to recognize the contributions of independent black filmmakers. We are especially thrilled to co-host the festival’s opening event and special screening of the iconic film, “Lady Sings the Blues”, a Motown Productions film produced by Berry Gordy starring Diana Ross in her feature debut, which now celebrating its 50th anniversary. ”

DetBFF co-founder Lazar Favors said the film also aligns with DetBFF’s other goal of elevating fashion and music. “It’s a natural fit that aligns with our film, fashion and music theme for this year’s festival,” he said. “And it gives a chance to support the Motown Museum as it begins a new chapter in American history.”

The museum, which is visited by hundreds of thousands of music and history fans each year, is currently undergoing a major $55 million expansion that will double its size and house a permanent stage offering scheduled performances and music sets. pop up. The museum has previously linked the three houses where Gordy turned young local talent into global stars – the Supremes, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, the Temptations and Marvin Gaye among them.

The DetBFF team is reviewing films and touring locations to prepare for the festival, which in its first two years has offered Detroit audiences 87 films and 20 workshops and panel discussions with vital Hollywood insiders. Among them was Detroit-born Qasim Basir, director of the landmark film A Boy, A Girl, A Dream starring Omari Hardwick and Meagan Good.

ABOUT THE FREEP FILM FESTIVAL

The Freep Film Festival is a documentary-focused festival produced by Detroit Free Press, Michigan’s largest news organization, in cooperation with its business arm, michigan.com. The festival is centered in downtown Detroit and takes place at venues including the Detroit Film Theater, Cinema Detroit, Redford Theater and the Michigan Science Center. Suburban venues include the Birmingham 8 Powered by Emagine – and Frame in Hazel Park. The festival focuses on documentaries with strong ties to Detroit or Michigan – although it also reserves great films without specific local ties. Freep Film Festival also presents parties and educational experiences for the film community and embraces the journalistic mission of Detroit Free Press, hosting in-depth and topical conversations after many of its films. The complete program of films is available on freepfilmfestival.com. Festival passes and tickets are on sale now on the website. New to the festival this year is “4 Nights. 4 movies. 4 Chefs,” in which the festival partners with the Frame restaurant in Hazel Park to feature film screenings in tandem with meals prepared by some of Metro Detroit’s top chefs. Other highlights include:

“2nd Chance”: In 1969, a bankrupt Detroit pizzeria owner, Richard Davis, invented the modern body armor. Charming and hot-headed – even shooting himself in the head 192 times – Davis made sensational marketing films, earning him celebrity status among police and gun owners. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2021.

  • ‘America, You Kill Me’: This world premiere looks at the life and legacy of local gay rights icon and Triangle Foundation co-founder Jeffrey Montgomery, who became a powerful voice against violence and discrimination after her boyfriend was murdered outside a Detroit bar in the 1980s.
  • “Bad Axe”: An Asian-American family in rural Michigan fights to keep their restaurant and the American dream alive in the face of a pandemic and more. It premiered at South by Southwest in Austin.

Images of the main films of the festival are available here. For inquiries, please contact Dawn Kelley, Expand Marketing Group, 734-765-1429, [email protected]

Detroit.Black.Film.Festival

ABOUT THE DETROIT BLACK FILM FESTIVAL

Presented by the Ford Foundation, the 3rd Detroit Black Film Festival (DetBFF), which was founded in 2020, continues to showcase the voices and stories of black independent filmmakers nationwide. DetBff is dedicated to screening excellent, high-quality films from seasoned and emerging filmmakers that shed light on a range of stories reflecting African American experiences, narratives, and culture. In addition to screening great films, the festival will feature masterclasses, networking with industry professionals, Q&As with the filmmakers, and a closing party.

Festival co-directors Lazar and Marshalle Favors are founders of Trinity Films Entertainment Group (TFEG), an umbrella company of the Detroit Black Film Festival. The couple are committed to working with determination to contribute to the sustainability and economic growth of the Greater Detroit area film community. “We strive to support filmmakers as artists and provide an exceptional platform for their work,” said Marshalle Favors. For more information on the Detroit Black Film Festival, visit: https://filmfreeway.com/DETROITBLACKFILMFESTIVAL

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13 Indian films awarded at international film festivals https://m8d.org/13-indian-films-awarded-at-international-film-festivals/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 05:49:27 +0000 https://m8d.org/13-indian-films-awarded-at-international-film-festivals/ Bollywood films are usually stored as masala pots, which serve hollow entertainment on a platter, with a side of subpar dialogue and narration. However, there is a different league of Indian cinema that deserves international accolades for its unparalleled storytelling and performances. Since Lagaan for Dil Se for Massaanlet’s look at 13 such Indian films […]]]>

Bollywood films are usually stored as masala pots, which serve hollow entertainment on a platter, with a side of subpar dialogue and narration. However, there is a different league of Indian cinema that deserves international accolades for its unparalleled storytelling and performances. Since Lagaan for Dil Se for Massaanlet’s look at 13 such Indian films that have made their way onto international platforms.

Indian movies that captured the hearts of the world

Lagaan

Cricket and Bollywood are followed as religions in India. It’s not new. But when this Ashutosh Gowariker director was nominated for an Oscar, he made headlines. It was the 3rd Indian film to hold this prestigious nomination. In 2010, the film was ranked 55 in Empire magazine’s 100 Greatest Films in the World of Cinema, and in 2011 it was listed in Time magazine’s special in the Top 25 Sports Movies of All Time.

Earth

Deepa Mehta is a directorial genius, just like her company Earth, released in 1998. The film takes place in 1947 during the partition of India. The film received praise not only in India but also abroad. Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Roger Ebert gave it 3 out of 4 stars and said the film had a universal message. The film was also highly recommended by The New York Times and The New Yorker, who praised Deepa Mehta’s directorial value.

mother india

Indian movies

It was the very first Indian film to be nominated for an Oscar. This is the story of a poor single mother who struggled to raise her sons. mother india was one of the biggest Indian box office hits of all time. Considered one of the best Indian films of all time, the film also won awards at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

Dil Se

Mani Ratnam’s directorial venture gave us Preity Zinta’s million dollar smile, a young Shahrukh Khan at his best, AR Rahman’s unrivaled music and the Netpac award at the Berlin International Film Festival in 1999 . Dil Se was the third film in Mani Ratnam’s trilogy of Indian films dealing with terrorism. It was also praised for its cinematography and screenplay at the Era New Horizons Film Festival and the Helsinki International Film Festival.

Massaan

Indian movies

This is the film that gave Bollywood Vicky Kaushal. For others it was a moving story of love and loss and one of those Indian films the world deserved to see. The film won several awards, not only here but also abroad. The film caused a stir and won awards at SAARC Film Festival, Sri Lanka in 2016, Sundance Film Festival in 2014, Indian Film Festival Los Angeles in 2016 and Cannes Film Festival in 2015.

Wasseypur Gangs

Anurag Kashyap’s directing genius paired with stellar class and brilliant acting, Wasseypur Gangs has a separate fanbase. With four Asia-Pacific Film Festival nominations, The Hollywood Reporter compared the film to a Tarantino-esque drama, and Variety pointed to the Coppola-like influences inherent in this mafia flick. Needless to say, it is one of those Indian films that has won several accolades overseas.

Dried

Indian movies

Starring Radhika Apte and Surveen Chawla in the lead roles, Dried is an intense drama written and directed by Leena Yadav. The film tells the story of four women living in a village in northwest India, where they are victims of Orthodox traditions, such as child marriage and other social problems. The four women maintain an endearing friendship, where they all struggle to find ways to freedom. Dried was screened at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival. It was nominated for the Asia Pacific Screen Awards and the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in 2016 and won awards at the Stockholm Film Festival in 2015.

The Disciple

The Disciple by Chaitanya Tamhane is a Marathi film that swept film festivals. It was one of the only Indian films to feature on the lineup of film festivals like the Toronto International Film Festival in 2021. At the Venice Film Festival, the film won Best Screenplay and at TIFF, it won the Amplify Voices award. . The film has also been part of prestigious festivals like the New York Film Festival and the Busan International Film Festival.

Devdas

Indian movies

Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s adaptation of the classic Bengali novel has enjoyed huge critical and commercial success in India. But not only that, Devdas was also India’s submission for the Oscar and was nominated for a BAFTA for Best Foreign Language Film. Time Magazine called it the best world film of 2002 and included it in the top 10 millennial films worldwide.

monsoon wedding

If you think planning a wedding is stressful, watch Mira Nair monsoon wedding, which talks about the emotional cost of planning a wedding. This film won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and received a Golden Globe Award nomination. Plus, it inspired his own Broadway musical. Apart from that, it was also nominated for a BAFTA and won a British Independent Film Award.

The namesake

Another Mira Nair directing venture on this list for all the right reasons. This 2006 film was based on the novel by eminent author Jhumpa Lahiri and was well received by moviegoers and critics. Starring Irrfan Khan, Tabu and Kal Penn, this film won the Love is Folly International Film Festival in Bulgaria and was nominated for the Gotham and Independent Spirit Awards.

Pather Panchali

Indian movies

One simply cannot have a list of the greatest Indian films of all time without including a film by Satyajit Ray. The visionary 1955 drama Pather Panchali was not only a highly acclaimed film, it also inspired a generation of filmmakers. It was the very first Indian film that caught the attention of international critics and also won the Best Human Document award at the 1956 Cannes Film Festival, among many others.

The lunch box

Indian movies

A moving film about food and love where simplicity was the hero, The lunch box was screened at International Critics’ Week at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival and the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. It also won the Critics Week Viewers Choice Award (Grand Rail D’Or) and was nominated in the Film category Not in the English Language from the British Academy Film Awards in 2015.

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IFFLA was born when most American film festivals ignored Indian cinema: Christina Marouda https://m8d.org/iffla-was-born-when-most-american-film-festivals-ignored-indian-cinema-christina-marouda/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/iffla-was-born-when-most-american-film-festivals-ignored-indian-cinema-christina-marouda/ Ritu Jha- Christina Marouda, founder and executive director of the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles (IFFLA), which is celebrating its 20th anniversaryand birthday this year returning to screenings and in-person events from April 28 to May 1, was born in Greece and has no Indian or South Asian roots. But growing up on the […]]]>

Ritu Jha-

Christina Marouda, founder and executive director of the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles (IFFLA), which is celebrating its 20th anniversaryand birthday this year returning to screenings and in-person events from April 28 to May 1, was born in Greece and has no Indian or South Asian roots.

But growing up on the island of Crete, Christina watched a lot of Indian films, mostly in Hindi, and fell so in love with them that she eventually gave birth to this festival after moving to the United States.

In a conversation with indica, Marouda recalled that in 2001-2002 she felt the time had come to introduce Bollywood to the homeland of the American mainstream and explained how the festival has grown over the past 20 years, offering being extended to South Asia this year. Excerpts:

What led you to create IFFLA? What do you like about Indian cinema?

I watched Indian movies growing up in Crete, Greece, and loved them. However, the idea of ​​an Indian film festival in Los Angeles developed around 2001. At that time, there was no platform for Indian cinema in the United States.

I worked at AFI Fest, which screened more than 150 films from all over the world each year, but Indian films were always ignored. It was the same with other international film festivals across the country.

To me, that made no sense given the volume, scale and legacy of Indian cinema. Moreover, 2001-02 was an interesting period for Indian cinema which crossed borders with Lagaan (2001) being nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars and the success of monsoon wedding (2001) and Play it like Beckham (2002). I felt that the time had come to launch IFFLA.

I am fascinated by the cultural diversity and nuances of regional Indian films. And these emerging filmmakers tell their deep, rich stories with depth and skill.

This is the year of IFFLA’s 20th anniversary. If you remember the two decades of your journey with Indian cinema, what has changed? And does that surprise you?

It was an amazing journey, informative for me and everyone involved in IFFLA, and full of surprises.

As for what has changed, when we started this journey in 2002, the international film community didn’t pay much attention to South Asian filmmakers and talent. This has changed dramatically, especially in the past five years. South Asian filmmakers, actors and executives are increasingly becoming the norm everywhere you look.

Of course, the viewing experience and the options people have have played a key role in giving festivals access to new films and also in the importance of a festival as a forum to bring the film community together.

As we return to an in-person festival after nearly three years, the importance of such community gathering and live interaction with the creators behind the films is exciting and essential.

How many films did you start with 20 years ago, and how does that compare to today’s attendance?

IFFLA was established in 2003 at ArcLight Hollywood presenting 20 films from or about India to nearly 3,000 attendees. This year’s festival features 26 films and six South Asian films. The last in-person festival in 2019 attracted over 5,000 attendees. Films from the vast and talented Diaspora filmmakers were also included and have now become a major draw at the festival.

The number of films has varied between 20 and 30. But our ancillary programs have grown and evolved over the years to include workshops, industry events, post-screening discussions, live musical performances and receptions, allowing festival-goers to watch films in a community environment. and a dynamic framework.

We have started working with all studios including HBO, Netflix, Disney, Warner Bros, Paramount, Sony, Amazon, NBC Universal, and through our One-on-One program we bring top executives to the festival and connect them with our filmmakers.

This year, we are going further. Our closing party will feature an event, not a movie, and it’s a live script reading of Alim’s uncle, a feature film by Kahlil Maskati, one of IFFLA’s Diaspora alumni, directed by Fawzia Mirza with well-known Diaspora actors reading the roles. We are also announcing a year-round mentorship initiative for filmmakers this year.

This year you also added South Asian films. Are you expanding and why? Is there a demand, need or greater participation of South Asians?

South Asian countries are all deeply interconnected due to similarities in their cultures, lifestyles, lived experiences and histories.

Indian cinema is of course the most evolved, but Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh are also emerging, offering beautiful avant-garde works. For example, the movie Rehana at the top of our “Spotlight on South Asia” segment, is the very first Bangladeshi film to premiere in Un Certain Regard at the Cannes Film Festival. It is a captivating film.

We are also screening five outstanding short films from other South Asian countries. We believe this is the right time to broaden IFFLA’s reach and focus on South Asian cinema.

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SF Bay Area is flooded with film festivals – here’s a look https://m8d.org/sf-bay-area-is-flooded-with-film-festivals-heres-a-look/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/sf-bay-area-is-flooded-with-film-festivals-heres-a-look/ Three film festivals in the Bay Area kick off this week while another in the South Bay offers more stuffed temptations as part of its second week of all-virtual programming. Pass the Remote highlights some of the prime cuts served at the San Francisco Greek Film Festival, the Poppy Jasper International Film Festival, and the […]]]>

Three film festivals in the Bay Area kick off this week while another in the South Bay offers more stuffed temptations as part of its second week of all-virtual programming.

Pass the Remote highlights some of the prime cuts served at the San Francisco Greek Film Festival, the Poppy Jasper International Film Festival, and the International Ocean Film Festival.

The San Francisco Greek Film Festival, which runs from Friday to April 16, offers a tasty and diverse menu this year with in-person selections at the Delancey Screening Room as well as virtual options.

The 6:30 p.m. opening night feature “Holy Emy” kicks things off in bold fashion with maverick drama that refuses to adhere to the dictates of any specific genre. Araceli Lemos’ award-winning directorial debut tells the unique story of a young Filipino girl named Emy (Abigael Loma) with stigmata abilities that appear to be inherited. When her sister (Hasmine Killip) becomes pregnant from a bad co-worker at a fish vendor who employs them both, Emy, already feeling alienated living in Greece, feels even more ostracized as her powers manifest in ways miraculous. “Holy Emy” is an intriguingly messaged film that comes from Saran Wrapped on an ever-interesting, multi-colored premise about being an immigrant.

If you’re in the mood for something sexy, head to the Delancey screening room on April 12 at 6:30 p.m. for the sultry “Aligned” by Apollo Bakopoulos. Abundant with the stunning views of Athens, Greece, as well as the lithe, chiseled physiques of its two leading men, “Aligned” tells the steamy story of a New York dancer (Dimitris Fritzelas) and a Greek dancer. (Panos Malakos) and their discovery that they make great studio partners and great friends, and potentially more than that, whenever they’re away from rehearsals. “Aligned” is erotic, stylized but not overly explicit. It descends smoothly.

Other notables include the intense thriller about the fallout of a relationship following a disaster “All the Pretty Little Horses” (6:30 p.m. Saturday) and the closing night feature, an epic set in Smyrna about a family dealing with raw emotional and physical issues. wounds from dark chapters in history, “My Beloved Smyrna” (4:30 p.m., April 16). For a full schedule and to see what’s available to watch online, visit https://grfilm.com.

There’s a lot of blossom – especially in terms of film festivals – in the South Bay this week. The Poppy Jasper International Film Festival runs from Wednesday through April 13 and is enriched with short films from the Bay Area as well as feature films and documentaries spanning the globe.

Touting its 2021 MovieMaker Magazine designation as one of the “50 Best Film Festivals Worth the Admission Fee,” the festival has its roots in Morgan Hill, San Martin, Gilroy, Hollister and San Juan Bautista. The stated mission is to focus on “diverse, inclusive and women-empowering films”. The one that caught my eye is Braden Swope’s “Human Resources,” an award-winning horror entry that finds a new hardware store employee (Hugh McCrae Jr.) discovering something dark and wrong about the job in his new job. It also screens at the District Theater at 8 p.m. Saturday. For a full list of films and to purchase tickets, visit https://pjiff.org/.

As studies and news reports continue to tell us, our planet is currently in a world of suffering with accelerating climate change. To throw some much-needed respect into Mother Nature’s path, why not dive into the International Ocean Film Festival this weekend and learn more about the wonders of the seas we must protect and meet adventurers who rejoice in the big blue?

The 19th annual festival takes place at three venues: the Cowell Theater at the Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture in San Francisco (Thursday through Sunday); the Smith Rafael Film Center (Friday to Sunday); and the Roxie in SF (Saturday through Sunday).

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LGBTQ Film Festivals Coast to Coast https://m8d.org/lgbtq-film-festivals-coast-to-coast/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 13:49:29 +0000 https://m8d.org/lgbtq-film-festivals-coast-to-coast/ On the east coast of Boston, the Wicked Queer Film Festival returns in person and virtually April 7-17 after only being virtual for two years, then OUTshine LGBTQ+ Film Festival Miami is back, bolder, brighter and in person from April 22 to May 1. Then on the west coast, the Outfest Fusion QTBIPOC film festival […]]]>

On the east coast of Boston, the Wicked Queer Film Festival returns in person and virtually April 7-17 after only being virtual for two years, then OUTshine LGBTQ+ Film Festival Miami is back, bolder, brighter and in person from April 22 to May 1. Then on the west coast, the Outfest Fusion QTBIPOC film festival runs April 8-17 with ten days of in-person and virtual screenings and events that showcase the work of today’s leading storytellers. At Outfest Fusion, attendees can also take part in nearly a dozen free community workshops, industry masterclasses, a one-minute movie contest, pitch contests, and performances. live. Outfest Fusion’s mission is not only to amplify these voices, but also to provide access and resources specific to the needs of the QTBIPOC community. Outfest Fusion programming exists to directly address and challenge the systemic access gap for LGBTQ+ people of color. At Outfest Fusion, they open the 2022 festival on April 8 at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center with a special awards show honoring Stephanie Beatriz (Encanto, Brooklyn Nine-Nine) with the Fusion Achievement Award and Sandra Oh (Killing Eve, The Chair , Umma) with the James Schamus Ally Award starting at 7:30 p.m. It’s just the start of the evening as they screen a series of short films showcasing the caliber of talent at Outfest Fusion. After the screening, there will be an after party in the fabulous courtyard of the JACCC for an unforgettable end to the evening. Tickets are $35. For more information…

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MOVE ME will perform at Full Frame Doc and ReelAbilities Film Festivals https://m8d.org/move-me-will-perform-at-full-frame-doc-and-reelabilities-film-festivals/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 22:25:31 +0000 https://m8d.org/move-me-will-perform-at-full-frame-doc-and-reelabilities-film-festivals/ MOVE ME is the feature debut of dancer/choreographer Kelsey Peterson. Co-directed by Daniel Klein, a former NYC/London chef (Bouchon, Craft, The Fat Duck) turned award-winning filmmaker and TV creator who has created over 170 international shorts. He is a founder of the acclaimed online documentary series The Perennial Plate, executive producer of PBS’s Road Food […]]]>

MOVE ME is the feature debut of dancer/choreographer Kelsey Peterson. Co-directed by Daniel Klein, a former NYC/London chef (Bouchon, Craft, The Fat Duck) turned award-winning filmmaker and TV creator who has created over 170 international shorts. He is a founder of the acclaimed online documentary series The Perennial Plate, executive producer of PBS’s Road Food (2022), director of the PBS series WEEKENDS WITH YANKEE (2019 – 2022) and producer of the Emmy-nominated PBS series. Awards The Victory Garden’s Edible Party (2013).

Following its world premiere at the 2022 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, MOVE ME will play at ReelAbilities Film Festival: New York, with more festivals to be announced shortly. MOVE ME will have its first airing in the United States on the weekly PBS/ITVS series INDEPENDENT LENS in the winter of the 2022-2022 season.

Co-director Kelsey Peterson said: “I wanted to tell this story to bring healing, on many levels – to those of us who have lost the things that defined us, to my beloved community of spinal cord injured spine. I think this film works to change a narrow narrative about people with disabilities, and that means a lot to me. If this film – or my experience – can serve as a bridge to connect able-bodied people to the disability experience of a way that holds more empathy and responsibility to make this world more inclusive and accessible, it would be an honor.”

Co-director Daniel Klein said, “I feel like my role as co-director was to help Kelsey tell his story and to help the audience have the same experience as me: to love Kelsey. , see the strength of disability and look into our own lives to accept and fight the challenges we face.”

The synopsis for Move Me is about 27-year-old Kelsey Peterson, who dove into Lake Superior off the shores of Wisconsin and emerged paralyzed. Now the former dancer is struggling to redefine who she is while adjusting to life with a disability. At the intersection of acceptance and hope, Kelsey unexpectedly finds herself faced with an opportunity to dance again, showing her a new path to acceptance, while struggling with the decision to participate in a cutting-edge clinical trial that could bring him so much desire. change – forcing her to assess the possibilities of her recovery, body and mind.

In Move Me, a first-time disabled female director simultaneously takes the reins behind the scenes, while revealing her inner REVOLUTION through raw on-screen storytelling.

Kelsey Peterson, co-director/producer

Kelsey was born in St. Paul, MN and grew up in different parts of the state, both urban and rural. She earned her Bachelor of Dance degree from the University of Montana in 2008, and later her yoga teacher certification from CorePower Yoga. Her previous journey was cut short when she suffered a spinal cord injury in 2012 and became paralyzed from the chest down. But Kelsey continues to dance, now in a wheelchair. She is a dancer, choreographer, writer and filmmaker. She is currently co-director, choreographer and dancer on A Cripple’s Dance, a live music and dance production featuring performers with disabilities. As a first-time director, she finds her choreographic training lends itself to the art of storytelling, which she draws on in her documentary film, Move Me. She enjoys using storytelling as a vehicle for healing and change.

Daniel Klein, co-director/producer

Daniel was born in St. Paul, MN, but grew up outside of London, England. After graduating from NYU, Daniel pursued a career in food and film. Daniel is the director and producer of the online documentary series The Perennial Plate, which won the James Beard Award twice (2013,2014). Daniel, a former chef (Bouchon, Craft, The Fat Duck), has created over 170 short films worldwide (with tens of millions of views and 9 vimeo staff picks) as well as the executive producer of PBS’s Road Food (2022), and director of the PBS series WEEKENDS WITH YANKEE (2019,20,22). He also produced the most recent season (and revival) of the nationally broadcast PBS series, The Victory Garden’s Edible Feast (2013), for which the team was nominated for an Emmy. Perennial Plate’s production arm has worked with clients as diverse as Conde Nast, American Express, Equal Exchange, Whole Foods and Capital One. Daniel has spoken about food and the importance of history at MAD, Harvard and the United Nations.

Co-directors: Kelsey Peterson, Daniel Klein

Producers: Kelsey Peterson, Daniel Klein, Madeline Brown

Executive producers: Lois Vossen, Sally Jo Fifer, Joanna Rudnick

Director of photography: Brennan Vance

Editor: Nico Bovat

For more information:

Film info: https://movemedoc.com

ReelAbilities Fest film information: https://reelabilities.org/newyork/film/move-me/

Full Frame Fest Film Information: https://www.fullframefest.org/film/move-me/

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