Seasonal festivals – M8D http://m8d.org/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 12:07:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://m8d.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34-120x120.png Seasonal festivals – M8D http://m8d.org/ 32 32 How local Ottawa music festivals are overcoming pandemic-induced challenges https://m8d.org/how-local-ottawa-music-festivals-are-overcoming-pandemic-induced-challenges/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 12:07:49 +0000 https://m8d.org/how-local-ottawa-music-festivals-are-overcoming-pandemic-induced-challenges/ Breadcrumb Links local arts Entertainment Bluesfest Executive Director Mark Monahan with the festival site behind him at LeBreton Flats. Photo by ERROL MCGIHON /ERROL MCGIHON Reviews and recommendations are unbiased and products are independently selected. Postmedia may earn an affiliate commission on purchases made through links on this page. Content of the article Just over […]]]>

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Just over a month ago, the underlying anxiety of Ottawa festival organizers trying to get their events going again this summer after two years of the pandemic threatened to turn into panic.

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In addition to the headaches caused by soaring gas prices and a labor shortage, they were discovering that key suppliers had disappeared. Hearts sank when they realized that one of the Ottawa-area companies that provided crucial infrastructure – the stage and flooring systems for the tents – was no longer in business.

“It’s not high-profile gear, but a lot of us need it,” said Mark Monahan, RBC Ottawa Bluesfest General and Artistic Director. “The only other companies that would do that, we would have to bring in from Montreal or Toronto. It made no sense.

In a move that TD Ottawa Jazz Festival director Catherine O’Grady described as “heroic,” Monahan struck a deal with the company that acquired the assets and Bluesfest was able to buy the equipment the festivals will need. The plan is to rent it during the summer season.

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“I have Bluesfest to thank for saving all the festivals in this town by buying up these assets and leasing them to us so we could put on a festival,” O’Grady said. “It was nothing short of heroic – otherwise none of us would have festivals this year.”

This is just one example of the unexpected challenges facing Ottawa festivals as they prepare to rebound this summer. After two years of trying to conjure up pandemic-proof events like drive-in shows, smaller-scale events, and online alternatives, the city’s two most popular festivals — Bluesfest and the jazz festival – are back in person in a big way, with a full roster of main stage headliners, including international artists, and as many days of programming as ever.

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Between the two festivals, Ottawa will be filled with live, outdoor music for nearly a month, a level of activity that attracts thousands of visitors, provides hundreds of jobs and generates more than $220 million in expenses. The fun begins in less than a week, as the TD Ottawa Jazz Festival celebrates its 40th anniversary, two years late, from June 25 to July 3. Featured artists include the Punch Brothers, Kamasi Washington, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, Corinne Bailey Rae, Emmylou Harris and Blue Rodeo, to name a few. The main stage returns to its traditional Confederation Park home, plus there’s a late-night stage at Marion Dewar Plaza, a concert series at the National Arts Center and free daytime shows on the first weekend.

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Hot on the heels of jazzfest comes RBC Bluesfest, which takes place July 7-17 at LeBreton Flats Park on the grounds of the Canadian War Museum, and features a lineup consisting of Alanis Morissette, Marshmello, Rage Against the Machine, Luke Bryant, Luke Combs and more. In all, up to 200 acts will perform on five stages.

Getting to this point has not been easy. Early in the planning process, Monahan feared that he would not be able to find enough workers with the technical skills to put on large concerts. The company that provided most of Bluesfest’s tech workforce, Project X, had gone out of business as workers fled to other sectors when the live music industry was put on hold during the pandemic. .

“It’s a huge problem for our industry,” Monahan said. “When there was no work, people found work elsewhere and so all these people who usually had these seasonal jobs went to work for someone else. Many of them have left the company.

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He found a solution by striking a deal with the stagehands’ union, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, which will certainly cost more but is a reliable source of labour. “We had no choice,” Monahan said. “We reached an agreement with the local union, and they were completely reasonable in reaching something that works for both of us. It will now be a union shop at Bluesfest.

Another work-related issue is volunteers not returning to festivals, O’Grady said, because they’re still nervous about COVID.

“We’ve had the benefit of a lot of volunteer work in the past, but a lot of those people aren’t able to come and help us this year, and I understand and that’s totally fine, but it means an expense that we’ve got ‘I’m not used to incurring,'” she said.

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It’s important to note that both festivals are not-for-profit organizations, each governed by a volunteer board of directors and deriving most of their revenue from ticket sales. In the case of Bluesfest, it is also one of the last large-scale independent music festivals in North America. most of the rest are run for profit by corporations.

This week’s announcement of $9.8 million in federal funding for Bluesfest relieves some of the festival’s financial pressure and will cover the purchase of a new main stage. “It allows us to pick up where we left off and come out bigger, better and stronger than ever before,” Monahan said, describing it as the biggest contribution in the festival’s 28-year history.

Still, both festivals are hoping last-minute ticket sales will see them through a tough time without raising prices.

“No one could have predicted the level of these cost increases,” O’Grady said, estimating them between 10 and 50 percent higher than expected. “And you can’t pass those increases on to the consumer because everyone is suffering. We have deliberately kept our ticket prices low, but we haven’t earned any revenue for almost three years, so we really need a lot of people to come.

lsaxberg@postmedia.com

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Summer Festivals and Events in the Pocono Mountains Are Worth Seeing | WTAJ https://m8d.org/summer-festivals-and-events-in-the-pocono-mountains-are-worth-seeing-wtaj/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:14:57 +0000 https://m8d.org/summer-festivals-and-events-in-the-pocono-mountains-are-worth-seeing-wtaj/ Sponsored by the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau Summer officially starts next week and with that it’s the return of seasonal activities including some like you’ve never seen before! As gas prices continue to soar, consider taking a vacation just a few hours away in the Pocono Mountains, where you’ll find plenty of fun, free and […]]]>

Sponsored by the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau

Summer officially starts next week and with that it’s the return of seasonal activities including some like you’ve never seen before!

As gas prices continue to soar, consider taking a vacation just a few hours away in the Pocono Mountains, where you’ll find plenty of fun, free and inexpensive options. Pocono Television Network’s Brianna Strunk shows us just one of many unique events that happen – let’s just say it’s kind of “sweet.” She takes us to the Maison Equestre which is an old horse farm transformed into a vacation rental and event venue.

Built on the site of a former famous horse farm from the 1950s, Maison Equestre, Pocono’s Best Country Getaway, is your location for that special occasion or vacation. They have four tennis courts, six basketball courts, a catch-and-release fishing pond, an in-ground pool, and more.

With over 100 acres of nature trails, be sure to bring your hiking boots! This is an opportunity to “discover nature at its best”.

Discover the Honey and Blueberry Festival on weekends from June 18 to July 24, 2022, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. In mid-June, the wild blueberries at Equestrian House reach their peak and are bursting with flavor. Sweet and delicious honey from their local bee farm is flowing. This family event takes place near their large arena and charming milk barn on the 100 acre property.

Admission to the inaugural Honey and Blueberry Festival is free. Pick your own wild blueberries. Learn more about beehive keeping. Children can discover the trampoline, tennis and basketball courts, and much more!

Here are some of the big events you can attend in the Poconos this summer:

For all the fun events in the Pocono Mountains, click here.

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Gourmet festivals 2022: Our top 10 https://m8d.org/gourmet-festivals-2022-our-top-10/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:12:17 +0000 https://m8d.org/gourmet-festivals-2022-our-top-10/ After two years of social distancing, the summer of 2022 seems like the first time we can properly — and safely — embrace big events again. In the world of food and drink, this can only mean one thing: the return of food festivals. In Britain, we love a food festival. There are festivals that […]]]>

After two years of social distancing, the summer of 2022 seems like the first time we can properly — and safely — embrace big events again. In the world of food and drink, this can only mean one thing: the return of food festivals.

In Britain, we love a food festival. There are festivals that take over entire cities, go around the country and last more than a week; and there are others popping up in weird places with even weirder themes…rolling cheese, anyone? Whatever the size, whatever the serving and whatever the weather, hungry Brits are sure to arrive in droves.

While this is by no means a definitive list, it does feature some big names, some lesser underdogs you may not have heard of but definitely should consider, and some newcomers who , we are sure, will become big favorites.

Taste of London, June 15-19, Regent’s Park

Every summer, Taste takes over central London for a next-level gourmet garden party featuring London’s hottest restaurants, up-and-coming kitchen heroes and a few chefs about to launch their next big event. Alongside this lineup, Daily Specials give you the chance to sample some of the tastiest new concepts in town, which only appear for one or two days. This year there will be eight delicious sessions spread over five days, with afternoon and evening sessions available.

Limited tickets are still available here.

Pub in the Park, June 17-September 18, various locations

Tom Kerridge’s brainchild, Pub in the Park celebrates everything there is to love… you guessed it, the glorious British pub. That means delicious food, award-winning chefs, chart-topping music, great drinks, but most of all, a fantastic time with friends and family. The traveling festival kicked off in May, with dates planned across the country through September.

Lots of tickets available here.

National Geographic Traveler Food Festival, 16-17 July, Business Design Centre, Islington

The Nat Geo food festival is back, bigger and better than ever. Expand your palate booth by booth on a foodie world tour, experience some of the world’s most exciting dishes in a Masterclass, or catch your favorite food writers performing at Speakers’ Corner. Plus, on the main stage, there are interviews with exciting culinary personalities and demonstrations by top chefs.

Book in your time slot here.

Birch Arising, 17-19 June, Hertfordshire

Birch is hosting its first-ever organized three-day outdoor adventure, complete with live music and DJs, chefs and producers, and restorative wellness experiences. In the kitchen, Executive Chef Robin Gill has curated an incredible selection of chefs, drinks and feasts, from seasonal Herb Kitchen banquets to oysters and Bloody Marys courtesy of Rock Oysters, complete with cream sandwiches ice cream from Happy Endings.

Find out more and buy a ticket here.

WingFest, July 16-September 25, various locations

It’s hard to choose between the many wing festivals in the UK, but WingFest is undoubtedly one of the biggest and one of the best. At each location in the UK, the festival launches over 200,000 wings from 40 different street vendors, restaurants and barbecue teams. Thousands of lucky ticket holders and a judging panel will also be able to vote for the Best Buffalo Wings, aka Spitiest, and Best Wild Wings, featuring some of the most flavors imaginable. There’s also plenty of boozy pit stops, live music, and ax throwing (yeah).

Buy a ticket for your local event here.

Bite to the Beat, August 26-29, York Racecourse

Designed to be a culinary extravaganza topped with a delicious helping of live music, this four-day festival will feature Michelin-starred and award-winning chefs from the north of England and Scotland, bringing some of the best restaurant cuisine to York for the first time. There will also be demonstrations and talks from culinary experts – a grazing paradise for those who love good food. There’s also a lineup of musical acts with something for everyone, and a backing band every night featuring great local talent.

Get all the information here.

Meatopia, September 2-4, Shadwell, London

The mythical meeting place for lovers of gastronomy and fire cooking is back. Over the weekend, 70 of the world’s top chefs will cook signature dishes using only sustainable wood and charcoal and quality ingredients from responsible sources. All that smoky, flavorful food is thirsty work, so thank goodness there’s a mind-boggling range of drinks on offer, from craft brewers to all sorts of spirits, cocktails and liquid delights. Add to that traveling marching bands, DJs and soul singers, and you have a festival to remember.

Unleash your inner caveman here.

Edinburgh Cocktail Week, October 7-16

After a sold-out festival in 2021, Edinburgh Cocktail Week will return in October for a further three days. A £5 wristband will get you £5 signature cocktails at 120 of the city’s best cocktail bars plus the Cocktail Village in Festival Square, which will be packed with 20 pop-up bars, live music, spaces DJ and delicious street food.

Get yours here.

Gatherings Festival, 20-21 August, Gisburne Park Estate, Lancashire

After a successful run of summer pop-ups last year, Gatherings Festival will launch this year in August at the historic Gisburne Park estate in Lancashire. It will be a weekend of cultural indulgence, with music, art, fabulous parties and wellness workshops.

Book yourself a stay here.

Summer Camp, The Good Life Society, 1-25 July, Hawarden Estate, North Wales

Presented as a series of micro-festivals over four long weekends in July, the Good Life Society Summer Camp is a chance to escape, reset, recharge, slow down, meet new people and learn new things. There are plenty of outdoor activities, but on the food front there’s a stellar lineup including Thomsina Miers, Max La Manna and Pippa Middlehurst. All this – and more – in a stunning North Wales setting.

Get a reservation here.

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8 most unusual festivals to experience in Germany https://m8d.org/8-most-unusual-festivals-to-experience-in-germany/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 16:13:17 +0000 https://m8d.org/8-most-unusual-festivals-to-experience-in-germany/ Think of events or festivals in Germany, and most likely Oktoberfest and traditional Christmas markets will come to mind first. Perhaps the various asparagus festivals, celebrating the beloved seasonal vegetable of the Germans, even come to mind. But otherwise? Well, don’t worry. There are plenty of fun events and great festivals in Germany to plan […]]]>

Think of events or festivals in Germany, and most likely Oktoberfest and traditional Christmas markets will come to mind first. Perhaps the various asparagus festivals, celebrating the beloved seasonal vegetable of the Germans, even come to mind. But otherwise?

Well, don’t worry. There are plenty of fun events and great festivals in Germany to plan a holiday with, some awe-inspiring, like the Kieler Woche, while others are based on history and culture. Still, some festivals are kind of weird and completely crazy, but completely hilarious.

Here are some of the best and most unusual festivals and events to experience in Germany. You can even register and participate in some. Are you in?

At Wattoluempiade “many teams from all over Germany and neighboring countries come together to play football, or similar, in the mud, get completely dirty and raise a lot of money for a cancer charity.”
(Photo credit: Wattoluempiade)

1. Wattoluempiade

brunsbuttel

With a play on two words, Watt and Olympics, for German speakers, there are clues in the name of this extraordinary event. The Watt is the muddy stretch of the Elbe estuary on the German North Sea coast. It’s an intertidal zone that leaves miles of flat, muddy terrain perfect for getting, well, muddy. Add “Olympics” and voila: the Mud Olympics.

They are played each year at low tide and bring together sportsmen who do not hesitate to get dirty and have fun. Many teams from all over Germany and neighboring countries team up to play football, or similar, in the mud, get completely dirty and raise a lot of money for a cancer charity.

Pro tip: The Wadden Sea is a remarkable ecosystem well worth exploring and as long as you go with a guide and put on rubber boots you won’t even get terribly muddy or caught in the rising tide. There are wonderful little islands – the Halligen – on which you can stay to really experience this unusual terrain.

Sailboat regatta, Kieler Woche in Kiel, Germany.
A sailing regatta in Kieler Woche
(Photo credit: Christian Beeck)

2. Kieler Woche

Kiel

This sailing event is one of superlatives: it is not only the biggest sailing and regatta event in the world, but also the biggest summer festival in Northern Europe. The Kieler Wocheor “Kiel Week,” brings together countless classes of sailing ships, great old tall ships and everything in between, even Viking ships and classic yachts, schooners, cutters, and more.

Windjammerparade during Kieler Woche in Kiel, Germany.
The Windjammerparade during Kieler Woche
(Photo credit: Sascha Klahn)

Attracting millions of visitors throughout the week, the Windjammerparade – the parade of tall ships where around 100 tall ships sail through the bay at 11am on the second Saturday of the week – is particularly breathtaking. Add other non-sailing events – such as live music, a funfair, food stalls and more – taking place ashore and you can easily spend the whole week there.

Pro Tip: The port city of Kiel on the Baltic coast, about 60 miles northeast of Hamburg and 90 miles south of the Danish border, is an ideal hub from which to explore the northern state of Schleswig- Holstein.

Dragon and participant in Drachenstich in Furth im Wald, Germany.
“Throughout the Old Town [during Drachenstich]you will see medieval decorations, people wearing medieval costumes, parades and lots of fun to be had everywhere.”
(Photo credit: Drachenstich Festspiele eV)

3. Drachenstich

Furth Im Wald

Furth im Wald is right on the border between Germany and the Czech Republic, 160 km east of Nuremberg, Bavaria. Here there is a lake called Dragon Lake; the city is called Drachenstadt, or “Dragon City”; and the forest region is steeped in folklore and myths. So the clues are there.

Every year, the city reenacts the legend of St. George slaying the dragon with a festival that will thrill any dragon lover. After all, it seems dragons are found all over the world and their appeal is undeniable, although they tend to be slain. The Drachenstich, the “Dragon Slaying Festival”, not only attracts the largest walking dragon in the world, but also transforms the old town into a veritable time travel destination. Throughout the old town you will see medieval decorations, people wearing medieval costumes, parades and lots of fun to be had everywhere.

Pro Tip: The only negative point of this event, which takes place in the summer, is that you cannot combine it with the Nuremberg Christmas Market. But instead, why not go for a drink in Pilsen, the Czech city famous for its beer, some 45 miles to the east? The city is beautiful and worth spending the night there.

4. Hirschrufen

Dortmund

Hirschrufen, or deer calling in English, is an art form – apparently. Those who participate in traditional hunts know that there are many ways to imitate the cry of wild deer, thus attracting them, and then slaughtering the poor beasts. But this deer calling competition itself involves no bloodshed and instead makes you wonder why you haven’t seen anything like it in years.

Held annually in Dortmund during the Hunt and Hound fair in North Rhine-Westphalia, the competition is one of the highlights of the fair and attracts even non-hunting enthusiasts. Dressed in traditional green outfits, the various competitors pull out either cow horns or more modern funnel-like tools to compete in this centuries-old tradition.

Pro Tip: While this part of Germany is infamous for its coal and steel industry, the region is also dotted with cities such as Düsseldorf and Cologne, ideal for city breaks, as well as being a starting point for the Rhine Valley.

Re-enactment Gladiator, Panem and Cirenses in Xanten.
“Some 500 ‘Romans’ – be they gladiators, legionnaires, merchants or lowly citizens – descend on the town of Xanten to take part in a week-long festival of all things Roman.”
(Photo credit: Axel Thuenker)

5. Panem And Circenses

Xantene

Bread and Games, also known as Swords, Bread and Games, is one of the largest Roman festivals in the world, taking place every 2 years in the town of Xanten, North Rhine-Westphalia , known for its Roman history. Once an expression of a politically corrupt way of taking and not giving back to ordinary people, today it focuses more on social activities in the name of history and fun.

Some 500 ‘Romans’ – be they gladiators, legionnaires, merchants or lowly citizens – descend on the town of Xanten to take part in a week-long festival of all things Roman, gladiator fights and market displays traditional games and eat the typical dishes of the time.

The 2022 event was recently canceled. But watch out for next year’s festival, currently scheduled for June 2024.

Pro tip: To keep with the Roman theme, while you’re there, don’t miss the over 180-acre Xanten Archaeological Park, home to the remains of a Roman temple and settlement.

6. Entertainment

Tubingen

In the southwest of Germany, in the state of Baden-Württemberg, a race with less serious competitors takes place every year in a rather picturesque setting. Competitors are small, bright yellow, and normally swim in private tubs. Since 1999, around 100 rubber ducks have swooped down the river to race in the name of charity.

But, although very cute, the race is just a good excuse to visit the old university town of Tübingen with its colorful half-timbered houses lining the Neckar river. Here you can take a boat trip or explore the old market square, the beautifully decorated 15th century town hall, the castle and the picturesque cobbled streets.

Pro tip: Tübingen is surrounded by vineyards, and it would be a shame to miss them. Why not take a tour of the surroundings and taste their best products?

Cows, Almabtrieb, Bavarian Alps.
Cows dressed for Almabtrieb
(Photo credit: moreimages / Shutterstock.com)

7. Almabtrieb

bavarian alps

In southern Germany, as well as in neighboring Austria, Almabtrieb is an annual event and festival welcoming cows, who spend the summer in the wild green meadows of the mountains. In September, they are brought back to the valleys for the winter. But it’s not just simple cows that descend into the valleys, these cows are decorated with flowers, ribbons and tasselled garlands. Their big bells are polished and rung in the villages, which are in party mode, and people line the streets to watch the cows parade.

Accompanied by traditionally dressed milkmaids and cowherds, it’s a unique parade of beautiful cows and a much-loved crop. But, if there is a herd where the animals are not trimmed, it means that one of the animals unfortunately died in the mountain.

Pro tip: These parades usually take place around St. Michael’s Day, September 29, and each village and farmer decorates their precious cows in different outfits. Try to catch the celebrations in a few different locations for variety.

Fingerhakeln in Garmish-Partenkirchen, Germany.
Fingerhakeln in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, in 2009
(Photo by Miguel Villagran/Getty Images)

8. Fingerhakeln

bavaria

Pulling someone’s finger may not seem like a sport to you and me, but to some it is indeed a very serious business. It’s even considered a martial art. Every year, in locations that change every year throughout Bavaria, the Fingerhakeln Meisterschaften (Finger Extraction Championships) take place.

They were traditionally led by men because these “fights” often originated in pubs against women, when men fought for their favor. The tradition may seem truly Bavarian, but it is indeed practiced in other countries like Norway, Denmark, Finland and further afield. Basically the fight consists of two men sitting on opposite sides of a table and they hook their middle or index fingers together, or sometimes use a strap instead, and pull. There is technique, skill and pain, but eventually an opponent is pulled across the table and loses.

Pro tip: Would you like to try it ? If you want to have a chance, you have to practice by subjecting your finger to proper training. Here are some instructions.

For more unique experiences in Germany, check out these articles:

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The best food festivals in France: where to go and when? https://m8d.org/the-best-food-festivals-in-france-where-to-go-and-when/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/the-best-food-festivals-in-france-where-to-go-and-when/ Markets brimming with local produce, bustling café terraces, sunny olive groves tended by third-generation farmers; former truffle estates, vineyards and oyster beds reflecting the beauty of each season… The assortment of romantic accolades granted to beautiful France is dizzying, and most relate to food. Attending a food festival is a golden ticket to tasting seasonal […]]]>

Markets brimming with local produce, bustling café terraces, sunny olive groves tended by third-generation farmers; former truffle estates, vineyards and oyster beds reflecting the beauty of each season…

The assortment of romantic accolades granted to beautiful France is dizzying, and most relate to food.

Attending a food festival is a golden ticket to tasting seasonal produce, meeting local producers and artisans, and immersing yourself in French food culture. Almost all French specialties have their specialty Party (festival).

Here is an excerpt from the new Lonely Planet book, Eat France, which celebrates the vibrant culinary scene of one of the world’s greatest foodie destinations, from Paris to Corsica. From communal tables in a vineyard to the most incredible citrus display in the world, get ready for the gourmet visit of your life.

Premiere France: where to go and what to do

Food festival calendar in France: where to go for the best local cuisine and when

Fresh black truffles at this two-day truffle festival in Sarlat-la-Canéda in the Dordogne © UliU / Getty Images/iStockphoto

January is for truffles

Truffle Festival
Feast on prized black truffles at this two-day truffle festival in Sarlat-la-Canéda in the Dordogne. The harvest of the black truffle from Provence is celebrated with a truffle fair in Aups.

The 10 most beautiful natural wonders of France

A large exhibition of citrus fruit elephants as part of the Lemon Festival
Art made of lemons and oranges at the famous Lemon Festival © AnnaBreit / Getty Images

February is for lemons and sea urchins

Lemon Festival
Gorge on lemons from Menton and admire monumental sculptures and floats made from the fruit during the seaside town’s Lemon Festival.

Oursinades
The aficionados of the sea ​​urchin (sea urchin) pokes fun at its bright orange innards in the fishing port of Carry-le-Rouet on the Côte Bleue.

The best activities to do with children in France

Get more travel inspiration, tips and exclusive deals straight to your inbox with our weekly newsletter.
Bayonne ham on sale at the Ham Fair
Bayonne ham on sale in the Basque Country © Owen Franken / Getty

Mars is for ham and scallops

Ham Fair
The best raw ham in the country has been enthusiastically celebrated at the famous Bayonne ham fair in the Basque Country since 1462.

Scallop Festival
Luxury scallops caught in the bay of St-Brieuc in Brittany are plentiful during this two-day festival closing the strictly regulated scallop fishing season. The fishing ports of Paimpol, Saint-Quay-Portrieux and Erquy take turns to welcome.

14 places to go to enjoy the best of France

May is for cherries

cherry festival
Baked in the sun, Céret en Roussillon celebrates its cherry harvest with two days of markets, tastings and live music. Or head to the cherry-rich Basque village of Itxassou.

The 10 best cycling routes in France

Garlic and peppers on a market in Uzes, France
Garlic and peppers in a market in Uzès, France © Filou-France / Getty Images

June is for garlic

Garlic Fair
Intoxicating scents invade the honey-colored town of Uzès in Languedoc during its garlic fair.

France has its first Michelin-starred vegan restaurant

July is for oysters

Oyster festivals
Throughout the summer, maritime towns around the Bassin de Thau on the Atlantic coast toast the iconic Bouzigues oyster with tastings, boisterous oyster parties around communal tables and visits to oyster farms. local.

Best experiences in French national parks

A man holding a bottle of champagne on the 'Avenue de Champagne' in Epernay
A man holding a bottle of champagne on Avenue de Champagne in Epernay © stocknshares / Getty Images

August is for Champagne

Champagne Route in Celebration
Free tastings in the cellars of over 20 great Champagne houses are a highlight of this weekend festival celebrating the world’s most famous bubbles.

The 7 Best Day Trips from Paris: Add a New Dimension to Your City Break

September is for mussels

Lille flea market
Europe’s largest open-air flea market in Lille is as much about overdosing on mussels as it is about picking up bargains.

Taste of Paris
A huge range of French food, regional cuisines and cooking styles are showcased – with tastings, meals, live cooking and cooking classes – at this brilliant food fair that fills the Grand Palais in Paris .

20 of the best free things to do in Paris: explore the French capital for less

A cow adorned with flowers
Cattle adorned with flowers at the La Belle Dimanche festival © Atlantide Phototravel / Getty

October is for chestnuts, cows and peppers

Chestnut Festival
Pick, eat and stock up on native chestnuts from the forests around Collobrières in the Massif des Maures in Provence.

The return of the alpine pastures
The return of cattle from the mountain pastures has been a reason for celebration since the Middle Ages. Annecy is celebrating with traditional music, cows decorated with flowers and street stalls selling local Savoie cheese.

Chilli Festival
Solemn blessing of the peppers of the city and ennoblement of a chilli knight (a pimiento knight) are the highlights of this Espelette pepper fair in the Basque Country.

Prepare your palate: a new French food and wine museum will open in Dijon

November is for wine

Beaujolais Nouveau
At the stroke of midnight on the third Thursday in November, bottles of cherry red Beaujolais Nouveau are opened – and what a party it is in Beaujolais and nearby Lyon.

Hospices de Beaune Wine Auction
The grandest of wine festivals in Burgundy’s prestigious Côte d’Or, it’s a three-day extravaganza complete with tastings, cuisine and a private wine auction.

The 10 most beautiful road trips in France

A Christmas market in France
The soft glow of the month-long Strasbourg Christmas market © Sami Sert / Getty Images

December is for the Christmas markets

Christmas market
Cup of hot wine (mulled wine) in hand, stroll around the fairy-lit stalls selling crafts and spices Bredele (biscuits) at the Strasbourg Christmas Market for a month.

The best time to go to France

Back from: Driving the Route Napoléon in France

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Gourmet nomad: the best street food in Paris

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Pymoor, Cambs, Festivals License Application https://m8d.org/pymoor-cambs-festivals-license-application/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:40:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/pymoor-cambs-festivals-license-application/ Published: 6:40 p.m. June 8, 2022 Updated: 09:58 9 June 2022 Farmer, businessman, chips and logistics entrepreneur, Ross Taylor could soon add “festival impresario” to his resume. He submitted an application to use part of Willow Farm in Pymoor near Ely for outdoor festivals and events. Mr Taylor, who also runs Corkers Crisps, applied for […]]]>

Published:
6:40 p.m. June 8, 2022



Updated:
09:58 9 June 2022

Farmer, businessman, chips and logistics entrepreneur, Ross Taylor could soon add “festival impresario” to his resume.

He submitted an application to use part of Willow Farm in Pymoor near Ely for outdoor festivals and events.

Mr Taylor, who also runs Corkers Crisps, applied for a license from East Cambridgeshire District Council and said some events could last up to 24 hours.

“The app also requests up to 12 times (to be agreed with the local authority at least 16 weeks in advance) extension of hours to be available for up to 24 hours,” its app says.

“The lure of additional flexible hours could be used when securing suitable events.

“This would give the venue the advantage of hosting specific events, eg bespoke events, seasonal events and the like, while building its portfolio in the region.”


The app is now advertised by East Cambs Council
– Credit: ECDC

Mr Taylor says in his application: ‘The nature of hospitality has changed dramatically as a result of the pandemic, with the demand for outdoor events becoming increasingly popular.’

He says he is looking to promote the area, providing top-notch events/festivals while working with the authorities to achieve “a successful venue, attracting businesses and individuals to the area”.

He employed an industry expert, Jane Gilliead, to push the request through the council.

Jane runs a business that specializes in licensing venues for festivals.

“Getting the right business license these days is just the start of a long process,” she says in her company’s promotional materials.

“I take pride in establishing the licensing needs of the individual, working with the authorities, securing the grant of the required premise clearance.

“After the successful granting of the authorization and the entry into force of the GDPR law, I can offer these additional tips to protect the license.”

You can comment on the application here

She adds, “Most companies aren’t aware of the steps they need to take to protect their Premise License.

“Having worked on both sides of the table helping companies get the licenses they need to helping people get their licenses back when violations have been notified, I have established a reputation as an expert in these areas. ”

The app says it will follow all regulations, including an age-related policy required by the Licensing Act 2003, which will reference the “Challenge 25” policy, and that all staff will be trained in the sale of alcohol under this policy.

All written records of training will be kept and made available for inspection by the police or an authorized officer.

And a refusal/due diligence book will be kept to record any refusal to sell alcohol and kept on site, it will be available for inspection by the police or an authorized officer.

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Missing Pieces: Why Film Festivals Treat Programmers Like Disposable Items https://m8d.org/missing-pieces-why-film-festivals-treat-programmers-like-disposable-items/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 16:29:00 +0000 https://m8d.org/missing-pieces-why-film-festivals-treat-programmers-like-disposable-items/ While the industry relies on programmers, they have never been treated as more disposable. What would it take to change that? With layoffs at Netflix and management changes at Warner Bros. Discovery, the needs of film festival programmers may seem low priority. At least that’s the kind of thinking that has created a huge predicament […]]]>

While the industry relies on programmers, they have never been treated as more disposable. What would it take to change that?

With layoffs at Netflix and management changes at Warner Bros. Discovery, the needs of film festival programmers may seem low priority. At least that’s the kind of thinking that has created a huge predicament for this profession, and one that has become acute as festivals cut budgets to attempt post-COVID comebacks.

A few weeks ago, this column addressed how the craft of programming has been marginalized by the industry, and at Cannes last month, many people told me they were crying out for a sequel.

For the slice of the filmmaking community that doesn’t operate on multimillion-dollar marketing budgets, festivals are an essential launching pad. The international festival calendar is back, as Cannes has made clear. The cocktail parties showed everything from upcoming editions of Locarno in August to TIFF in the fall, the latter bringing the majority of its strong new programming team to the south of France.

Cannes was brimming with confidence about the need for in-person festivals around the world. Over the first weekend, I moderated a conversation about the future of festivals with 30West executive Trevor Groth, who served as Sundance’s programming director for years, and asked him to respond to information that the Park City event planned to keep its hybrid format next year. .

“It’s a tough question,” he said. “One of the things they said is they’ve reached more people than ever before, which is a good talking point. But what impact has that had on those people versus at the festival in person? There was a certain type of film that I didn’t like until I went to a film festival. Certain types of films, if they are shown at a festival, you savor them and enjoy them in a different way. I think that happens a lot more at film festivals than with someone streaming it at home, when they might not have the patience to to end.

As Groth points out, festivals advocate that certain films have a place in the culture and business of cinema.

But there is little support system for the people who choose these films. World United Programmers, a loose consortium of programmers from around the world, held a packed happy hour on the first day of the festival where frustrations over lack of infrastructure and respect for the profession were rampant. However, I detected few mobilization efforts.

An upcoming report from the Film Festival Alliance examines the staffing, labor and compensation of festivals, primarily in the United States (the full report will be released later this month, but the organization tells me about it). ‘sent in advance). Participating festivals were not named, but the sample size is formidable: 108 film organizations participated, most of which had annual operating costs of over $500,000.

Most festivals with revenues of $100,000 or more used staff and independent contractors (16% of festivals are run entirely by volunteers). The report includes remarkable details on the operational structure, inclusion efforts, and even vaccination policies.

But for the purposes of this column, I was struck by details regarding the financial security of programming staff. According to the survey, compensation for programming directors at these festivals ranges from a low of $500 (insert shock emoji here) to a high of $240,000 (same); Additionally, the report shows that festivals often spend up to half of their revenue on paying directors.

Meanwhile, so many programmers are assembling their profession piecemeal that festivals are building their budgets around the notion that programming is a disposable piece of a larger whole. As festivals rework their budgets around pandemic-era cuts, work has never looked more vulnerable. Many festivals struggle to build a programming team that supports year-round work, which devalues ​​the programmer market as a whole. (Disclosure: IndieWire is owned by Penske Media, a majority shareholder of SXSW, which has a year-round programming staff in addition to freelancers.)

When I wrote in this weekly column about the layoffs at the Rotterdam International Film Festival, the festival said in an official statement that it was working to create a more sustainable infrastructure that took into account its 2 millions of euros. At Cannes, IFFR announced its new programming team and its executives said they were finally ready to talk. So, the first weekend of Cannes, I popped into the Netherlands pavilion to sit down with IFFR General Manager Marjan Van der Haar and Artistic Director Vanja Kaludjercic to get their side of the story.

IFFR

“We looked closely at how much a healthy and sustainable percentage of the budget would be the cost of staff,” Van der Haar told me, adding that they looked to the structures of other European festivals operating on a scale similar, including San Sebastian, Locarno and IDFA. “Then we went back to the drawing board to create an organization capable of achieving our future goals.”

Outside of Kaludjercic, the new programming staff is made up entirely of seasonal contractors. “Financially, this is how we can ensure that we are in a healthy position for the festival that we want to organize, which is still on a large scale,” Kaludjercic said.

She added that the independent staff structure was an outgrowth of her own experiences. “My career was exactly like that until just a few years ago,” she said. “I understand its precariousness, but I also understand how many opportunities it has given me. If it hadn’t been for the wide variety of independent gigs, I wouldn’t be where I am. am today I lived in many places that were really expensive I know what it’s like when you juggle I don’t know how many gigs and nobody pays but I managed to learn programming because for many years I programmed in different places.

This is a business that requires excitement and passion to justify the hard work, but the outcome of IFFR’s belt-tightening is symptomatic of a greater existential threat to the profession. Elsewhere in Cannes, I ran into Ava Cahen, the new artistic director of La Semaine de la critique, 35, whose entire programming committee works on a voluntary basis.

“I’ll work on that,” she told me. “When you engage in this work, you have to balance it with other work that generates income. It’s a job of passion, but we need a selection committee that doesn’t put them in a precarious position.

The irony of all these discussions was the image of Cannes director Thierry Fremaux living like a rock star in Cannes, working the red carpet every day and cavorting with talent under the gaze of the crowds. Fremaux embodies Cannes and the decision-making process behind the official selection. Some programmers I know have denigrated the festival for not opening up its team to more input from the international programming community. “They’re protecting the sellers,” one veteran scolded me, insinuating that Cannes’ selection process has more to do with the preferences of film sellers than those who officially select them.

Maybe. But the potential for Cannes to elevate the work of a festival programmer to movie star status is also quite incredible and worth considering by the rest of the industry: programmers serve as the web of bonds between talent and the festival environment. This is not a disposable role; it’s the one that makes a festival interesting in the first place.

But it’s not one that the festival’s current business model treats as a priority. The problem this creates goes beyond maintaining the status quo. This undermines the potential to attract new talent to an area that badly needs diversification. If we want a better representation of the rising voices of the cinema, we must invest considerably in the work of programming these films.

If festivals cannot afford year-round staff, the industry should rethink how it allocates its resources to support this profession. It is not enough to sponsor the festivals themselves; a separate fund may be needed specifically for freelance programmers, and a governing body to determine how to allocate those funds. This could help programmers who can check their employment status at multiple festivals, easing the pressure on individual festivals to come up with Tetris-like solutions to retain staff.

Who is best placed to organize such support? On the European side, I bet on the International Federation of Film Producers, which represents the needs of major festivals but which has not yet defined its curatorial role. In North America, the Film Festival Alliance has already raised the question of how festivals could better share resources when their programming teams overlap. They would be well placed to formalize this concept with a centralized fund.

The question of who pays for all this is more difficult. As the industry looks to a future that treats in-person festivals as a crucial part of their existence, major distributors and other festival-dependent entities should consider how certain aspects of their annual budget might support people whose programming efforts fuel their operations. . Contribute to a collective fund and everyone will benefit: festivals retain better programmers and festivals expose audiences to the best films, allowing the industry to support a wider range of cinema.

I don’t expect Netflix or Warner Bros. Discovery prioritizes programmers’ salaries while accommodating their vast expectations for results, but this speaks to the disconnect between the field of programming and the industry that benefits from its work.

There are countless grants and other initiatives to support filmmakers; there could always be more. But once those movies are made, someone has to give them the platform to see them, and current evidence suggests that if the industry doesn’t spend money to support that process, no one else will. will do it.

Is there another way to support the programming area by centralizing resources? Or is the profession doomed to collapse in a sea of ​​discontent? Send me your solutions and I might elaborate on them in a future column: eric@indiewire.com

Browse previous columns here.

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Summer 2022 to-do list: The movies, music, recipes, drinks, festivals and board games that will make this season unforgettable https://m8d.org/summer-2022-to-do-list-the-movies-music-recipes-drinks-festivals-and-board-games-that-will-make-this-season-unforgettable/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 17:36:16 +0000 https://m8d.org/summer-2022-to-do-list-the-movies-music-recipes-drinks-festivals-and-board-games-that-will-make-this-season-unforgettable/ Illustrated by Simone Noronha After two years of false starts and continued restrictions, the summer of 2022 looks promising. Music festivals are back, theaters have reopened, and many of us feel more comfortable inviting friends and family to join us at home or at the cabin for board games. on the beach and outdoor dining. […]]]>

Illustrated by Simone Noronha

After two years of false starts and continued restrictions, the summer of 2022 looks promising. Music festivals are back, theaters have reopened, and many of us feel more comfortable inviting friends and family to join us at home or at the cabin for board games. on the beach and outdoor dining.

But two years of limited fun in the sun might have you feeling a little rusty when it comes to making the most of Canada’s warmer months. With that in mind, the Globe has put together a to-do list of music, movies, picnic recipes, board games, cabin gear and road trips that will make summer 2022 the best for a long time!

Attend a music festival and compose your seasonal soundtrack

Temples perform during Osheaga on August 5, 2017.Tim Snow

Dedicated festival-goers – and festival organizers – have struggled over the past two years as the pandemic sabotaged plans for music festivals from coast to coast. This year, however, many of Canada’s best-loved and longest-running music festivals are back, including the venerable Mariposa Folk Festival in Orillia, Ontario, which is celebrating over 60 years (with a little hiatus). Also back this summer: the Osheaga Music Festival in Montreal and the Winnipeg Folk Festival which, along with tours by The Weeknd and Avril Lavigne, made our top 10 music events of summer 2022.

Every summer needs a score, and to that end, we’ve put together a guide to this season’s biggest new releases (think: Lizzo, whose About this time is a top contender for Song of the Summer, along with Metric and The Sadies). Complete your seasonal playlist with picks from Juno winner Charlotte Cardin, newcomer Tesher and some key pieces from the history Rolling Stones in concert at El Mocamboand you have the perfect summer soundtrack.

Book your summer theater tickets

Luke Kimball, the actor playing Albus Severus Potter, and Trevor White as Harry Potter backstage at the Harry Potter and the Cursed Child premiere in Toronto.CARLOS OSORIO/The Globe and Mail

The Shaw and Stratford festivals are both celebrating big anniversaries this year: the Stratford Festival, which held its first season in Stratford in 1953, celebrates its 70th season in 2022, while the Shaw Festival, which launched in Niagara- on-the-Lake in 1962, celebrating its 60th season. The math doesn’t quite add up, since Shaw counts the canceled 2020 theater season, unlike Stratford. Either way, both festivals are curating celebration-worthy lineups for 2022.

Meanwhile, in Toronto, the summer stage season kicks off with the highly anticipated Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, the Potterverse musical slated to premiere in 2020. To prepare for the show, which kicked off May 31 and will run through December, our theater critic Kelly Nestruck read all of JK Rowling’s original books and found an unexpected kinship with their titular magician. Additionally, for behind-the-scenes Potterverse action, the Globe followed actor Luke Kimball, who plays Albus Potter in the play, on opening day; take a look at our photo report here.

And, on the west coast, Marsha Lederman has three must-see plays in Western Canada, including the touring production of the Broadway hit hamilton.

Refresh yourself with a must-see TV…

For every perfect, sunny summer day, there’s bound to be one that’s rainy – or one so hot you’d rather hide indoors. Fortunately, as John Doyle reports, the summer streaming TV slate offers easy and airy viewing, like the premiere of Ms. Marvela new season of Umbrella Academy and the Game of Thrones spin-off dragon house, among other escapes on the small screen.

…or a blockbuster on the big screen

Universal Pictures/Amblin Entertainment via AP

With warm temperatures come big, awe-inspiring summer hits. This year’s summer movie season kicked off with Top Gun: Maverickand will continue with a number of franchise sequels and prequels, including a new Jurassic World movie, more Thor: Love and Thunder and Minions: The Rise of Gru. There’s also non-franchise stuff, like The gray manwith Ryan Gosling, and David Cronenberg’s instantly controversial film Future Crimes. Check out Barry Hertz’s full list of the best summer 2022 movie bets and, if nothing strikes your fancy, consider this slightly shorter list of under-the-radar movies coming out over the next few months.

open a book

Summer is for light and breezy beach reads, sure, but if you fancy a truly chilling dystopia, a gripping memoir, or a deep dive into the Montreal mafia, there’s a new book this season for you. Emily Donaldson rounds up 38 of the best summer reads here.

Host a picnic worthy of a celebrity chef…

Summer meals mean one thing: lots of seasonal produce and eating outdoors. For inspiration for alfresco dining, Gayle MacDonald spoke to three of Canada’s top chefs — Vikram Vij, Susanne Barr and Ryan Oabel — to find out what they’ll be packing in their picnic baskets this year . From butter chicken cutlet to cauliflower steak, their recipes will add unexpected delicious touches to your outdoor feast.

…combined with a sip to go

During the pandemic, hard seltzers and single-serve cocktails have skyrocketed in popularity, as they’re perfect for outdoor social gatherings. If you’re not sure where to start with canned mixed drinks or are looking for something new to try, Christopher Waters has eight picnic-ready choices. Or, if you’re looking for something more classic, consider the Aperol spritz, which can be easily adapted to your tastes.

For oenophiles, there are many wines that taste great over ice. And with sweltering summer temperatures already present in many parts of the country, there’s no better time than the present to enjoy a cool drink (or two). Waters offers some tips on how to enjoy wine over ice.

Non-drinkers, or those simply looking to cut back on their alcohol intake this summer, will know that sparkling waters have never been more popular. From maple sapsucker to cannabis-infused Eau Well, you’re spoiled for choice if you abstain from alcohol.

Try Stanley Tucci’s pasta

Since the start of the pandemic, Tucci has also been sharing his love of cooking and cocktails on Instagram, either mixing up the perfect Negroni for his wife or demonstrating how to make Spaghetti con zucchine alla Nerano. Christopher DiRaddio asked Tucci for some of his summer lodging tips, including how to pair food with cocktails and what book he’ll bring to the beach.

Take the road

Nicholas Stepchuk/Bartlett Lodge

If you’re planning to travel this summer, but are wary of airport delays and travel restrictions, why not keep it close to home? For food-driven travellers, Gayle MacDonald has compiled a list of road trip-worthy restaurants across the country, while those looking to explore some of Canada’s lesser-known destinations can find advice in the travel guide. this year’s Hidden Canada, which highlights under-the-radar travel destinations from coast to coast.

Try a new board game

When you find yourself at the cabin or campsite with no wifi, no data, and a rainy afternoon, few activities can beat a board game. And if you’ve had enough of Monopoly or Scrabble, there are plenty of new classics to turn a rainy day into a day to remember — just ask Vancouver’s Jay Cormier and London, Ont.’s Sen-Foong Li. board game designers who offered their selection of the best games of the summer.

Standing Equipment

A great summer getaway can be awesome with the right gear. From a portable grill to sleek vegan slides to an incredibly powerful Bluetooth speaker, Odessa Paloma Parker packs everything you need for the perfect escape from the city.

And finally, don’t forget the sunscreen

It’s especially important to protect your skin from the sun in the summer, when the sun’s strong UV rays, combined with spending a lot of time outdoors, put you at increased risk for skin damage. For those wary of skincare products that contain lots of hard-to-pronounce synthetics, there are more all-natural “clean” sunscreens on the market than ever before. You do not know where to start ? Truc Nguyen is here to help you with its guide to ecological sunscreens.

Register for The Globe Arts & Lifestyle Newsletters for more news, features and advice delivered to your inbox.

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List of Upcoming 2022 Music Festivals in New Jersey https://m8d.org/list-of-upcoming-2022-music-festivals-in-new-jersey/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 13:53:10 +0000 https://m8d.org/list-of-upcoming-2022-music-festivals-in-new-jersey/ Concerts are going strong for the rest of the year in New Jersey. Every artist who has announced a tour for 2020 and 2021 has postponed it to this year, so there are so many options to enjoy live music. If you’re looking for more of an all-day activity, there are a few upcoming music […]]]>

Concerts are going strong for the rest of the year in New Jersey. Every artist who has announced a tour for 2020 and 2021 has postponed it to this year, so there are so many options to enjoy live music.

If you’re looking for more of an all-day activity, there are a few upcoming music festivals for all different genres, so there’s something for everyone.

Stagecoach Festival 2022 – Day 2

Getty Images

I grew up going to music festivals every summer from my teens into my 20s. The Vans Warped Tour was something my friends and I looked forward to all year. From 2002 until the very last in 2019, I did not miss a summer.

Vans Warped Tour

Getty Images

I even met my husband at the Warped Tour in the summer of 2007 when his band Crash Romeo played on the tour.

Music festivals aren’t just about the music, they’re about the experience. It’s entertaining and an escape from the daily hustle and bustle. You meet new friends, enjoy food and drink, and watch multiple artists perform throughout the day or even the weekend.

We may be halfway through 2022, but summer has only just begun and music festival season has finally arrived.

Here’s what’s happening in New Jersey for the rest of the year:

Michael Arnone’s Crawfish Party

June 3-5

Sussex County Fairgrounds, Augusta, NJ

Live the southern lifestyle right here in New Jersey. The Crawfish Fest is exactly what it sounds like and if you don’t know what it is, it’s a crawfish boil that’s very popular in southern states like Louisiana.

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival

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Enjoy good southern cuisine and two music stages all weekend long.

Atlantic City Beer and Music Festival

June 4-5

Bader Field, Atlantic City, New Jersey

Two full days of pure beer, food and music. This festival features hundreds of beer, food and merchandise vendors, and best of all, legendary pop-punk bands New Found Glory and my all-time favorite Alkaline Trio performing live.

All participants must be 21 years old.

Barefoot Country 2022

June 16-19

Piers de Morey, Wildwood, NJ

This one is for country music fans. Some of country music’s biggest stars hit the beach in Wildwood. Artists like Jason Aldean, Eric Church, Florida Georgia Line, Walker Hayes, Bret Michaels (yes, from Poison) and many more.

TidalWave Music Festival

August 12-14

Pier Playground, Atlantic City, NJ

Another for country fans featuring everyone’s favorite country boy, Luke Bryan.

57th Academy of Country Music Awards – Show

Getty Images for ACM

Other acts include Dierks Bentley, Chase Rice, Mitchell Tenpenny, Lauren Alaina and many more. This festival takes place on the beach in Atlantic City, near Caesars.

XPoNential Festival

September 16-18

Liberty Mortgage Pavilion, Camden, NJ

If you’re constantly on the lookout for new music from up-and-coming artists, this is a festival you want to check out. You may not know many of the artists on the lineup, but that’s the point, for you to discover new music.

SEA.HEAR.NOW Festival

September 17-18

North Beach Asbury Park and Bradley Park

A fall music festival at the beach sounds amazing and add the fact that Stevie Nicks and Green Day are headlining, I’m sold. Other acts include Cage the Elephant, Gary Clark Jr., The Head and The Heart, Peach Pit, and more.

The Hella Mega Tour – Chicago, Illinois

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Some professional surfers will also be in the ocean.

And you know you’re going to be hungry. Some of the best restaurants in Asbury Park will serve up great bites.

frenetic city

September 24

Orange Loop Amphitheater, Atlantic City

This festival debuts with alternative/indie music, vendors and food trucks. Artists include Car Seat Headrest, Yo La Tengo, Snail Mail, Shannon and the Clams, and more.

Submersion Festival

October 7-8

Paradise Lake Campgrounds, Hammonton, NJ

No matter where you are on the electronic music spectrum, there’s a performance for you. Hope you are a night owl as this festival runs until sunrise all weekend. It’s also BYOB but be sure to read the rules about it.

Artists include Daily Bread, Kahn & Neek, Luke Vibrant, and more.

Netflix’s Most Popular TV Shows

These are the most popular TV shows ever to air on Netflix, based on hours watched during their first 28 days on air.

NJ Beach Tag Guide for Summer 2022

We are coming another summer to the Jersey Shore! Before you lose yourself in the excitement of sunny days on the sand, we calculate how much seasonal/weekly/daily beach beacons will cost you, and pre-season deals you can still take advantage of!

The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of Kristen, producer of New Jersey morning show 101.5. All opinions expressed are his own.
Questions, corrections or comments? Email producer Kristen at kristen.accardi@townsquaremedia.com or follow her on Instagram.

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List of important Indian holidays in June 2022 https://m8d.org/list-of-important-indian-holidays-in-june-2022/ Tue, 31 May 2022 04:44:27 +0000 https://m8d.org/list-of-important-indian-holidays-in-june-2022/ Here is the complete list of Indian holidays for the month of June 2022. List of important Indian holidays in June 2022 India is considered a country of “unity in diversity” which has multiple cultures, languages, traditions and diversity in festivals. Incredible India fits best because India is a land of diverse religions and festivals. […]]]>

Here is the complete list of Indian holidays for the month of June 2022.

List of important Indian holidays in June 2022

India is considered a country of “unity in diversity” which has multiple cultures, languages, traditions and diversity in festivals. Incredible India fits best because India is a land of diverse religions and festivals. Throughout the year, various festivals and events take place given the ancient Indian tradition which coincides with seasonal changes.

The weather is wonderful in the month of March with the festive atmosphere of people all over the world. This month starts with Mahashivratri which is one of the biggest festivals in India followed by important festivals like Holi, Phulera Dooj.

Here is the list of festivals for the month of June 2022:

# Name of festivals Date
1 Guru Arjan Dev Punyatithi June 02, 2022 (Thursday)
2 Maharana Pratap Singh Jayanti June 02, 2022 (Thursday)
3 Vinayaka Chaturti June 03, 2022 (Friday)
4 Jamai Sasthi (day of the son-in-law) June 05, 2022 (Sunday)
5 world environment day June 05, 2022 (Sunday)
6 Dhumavati Jayanti June 08, 2022 (Wednesday)
seven Dhumavati Jayanti June 08, 2022 (Wednesday)
8 Vrishabh Utsava June 08, 2022 (Wednesday)
9 Masik Durgashtami June 08, 2022 (Wednesday)
ten Mahesh Navami June 09, 2022 (Thursday)
11 Ganga Dussehra June 09, 2022 (Thursday)
12 Nirjala Ekadashi June 10, 2022 (Friday) – June 11, 2022 (Saturday)
13 Ramalakshmana Dwadashi June 11, 2022 (Saturday)
14 Gayatri Jayanti June 11, 2022 (Saturday)
15 Pradoch Vrat June 12, 2022 (Sunday)
16 Vaikasi Visakam June 12, 2022 (Sunday)
17 Vat Purnima Vrat (Fasting) June 14, 2022 (Tuesday)
18 Sant Kabir Jayanti June 14, 2022 (Tuesday)
19 Jyestha Purnima June 14, 2022 (Tuesday)
20 world blood donor day June 14, 2022 (Tuesday)
21 Festival Name”>Raja Festival (Mithuna Sankranti) June 15, 2022 (Wednesday)
22 Guru Arjan Dev Martyr June 16, 2022 (Thursday)
23 Sankatahara Chaturthi June 17, 2022 (Friday)
24 Sankashti Chaturthi June 17, 2022 (Friday)
25 Goa Memorable Day June 18, 2022 (Saturday)
26 Fathers Day June 19, 2022 (Sunday)
27 Kala Ashtami, Kalashtami June 20, 2022 (Monday)
28 The longest day of the year June 21, 2022 (Tuesday)
29 Kharchi Puja June 22, 2022 (Wednesday)
30 Sao Joao Feast of Saint John the Baptist June 24, 2022 (Friday)
31 Yogini Ekadashi June 24, 2022 (Friday)
32 Pradoch Vrat June 26, 2022 (Sunday)
33 international day against drugs June 26, 2022 (Sunday)
34 Rohini Vrat June 27, 2022 (Monday)
35 Masik Shivaratri June 27, 2022 (Monday)
36 Darsha Amavasya June 28, 2022 (Tuesday)
37 Ashadha Amavasya June 29, 2022 (Wednesday)
38 Chandra Darchan June 30, 2022 (Thursday)

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